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Self Development

Another ONE thing: Nothing

In my last post, I shared finding and focusing on the ONE thing that drives successful outcomes for me more than any other – that focus has been very powerful.  What about shifting gears away from accomplishing – to enjoying times of not accomplishing anything of “importance.”

On a beautiful snowshoe outside of Breckenridge, I got a lucky shot of my Havanese “Ziggy.” It’s a great image of being in the moment.

Lots has been written lately about Covid burnout, the need for vacation, the importance of recharging.  I am just beginning to explore the question, “How can I thoughtfully accomplish nothing so that I’m recharging?”  Can I shift my thinking about time off to believe that thoughtfully accomplishing “nothing” has value?  Don’t get me wrong – I screw around plenty, but I often feel guilty when I do.  I’m exploring how I can authentically, deep down, value being completely devoid of thoughts of the normal day-to-day to recharge. I’m finding it harder for me than work.  I must be doing it wrong.

New Year, The ONE Resolution

I made a New Year’s Resolution and have been trying it out. It is based on principles from two sources:

The foundation of my resolution is from The One Thing, and it’s related to work.  The One Thing’s main premise (my words) is that while we all strive to do many, many things (again, I’m talking work here) there is ONE THING, one activity, that if done well, drives successful results more than all the other things that we think we need to do – including things we want to do, maybe things we think only we can do… The ONE THING acts like the proverbial “first domino” in the sequence to results.  I have found that ONE THING for me, and am doing my best to apply discipline every day toward accomplishing it.

And this is where the second principle comes into play – the idea that Ego is the Enemy.

In order to focus on the ONE THING, I have to put my ego aside because my ego is happiest doing MANY things.  My ego reminds me that I am good at more than just the ONE THING, and my ego (all of me really) feels stimulated when I do many things.  Plus, my ego loves demonstrating to others my wide range of expertise and wisdom – when I do, my body is flooded with pleasant hits of dopamine!

So, the second principle requires that I put my ego’s desires on hold until I’ve accomplished enough of the ONE THING.

This seems to be working.  Of course, it’s just January 20th.

Trust Drives Colorado’s Entrepreneurial Progress

I got to thinking about TRUST following my interview with co-founders Jenn Knight and Niji Sabharwal of AgentSync.  Jenn said that because they are spouses, they have an existing level of deep trust, which allows each to more readily accept the other’s judgement, facilitates candid dialogue, and ultimately allows the company to move more quickly.  This is consistent with the theme of the book titled, The Speed of Trust.

Time and again I hear from entrepreneurs and founders that the spirit of collaboration has helped them succeed in Colorado.  Colin McIntosh of Sheets & Giggles (episode), talked about how Chris White,  founder of Shinesty, helped him to initially establish Sheets & Giggles’ shipping from the Shinesty facilities.  That kind of collaboration can’t happen without trust – Colin trusting that Chris wouldn’t try to somehow take Colin’s products or customers, and Chris that teaching Colin the shipping ropes and helping him get started would somehow, oh, I don’t know, build Karma in exchange for their effort.  It seems to me that TRUST is a core value in Colorado’s entrepreneurial community, and it’s one that is universally rewarding.

More Colorado Collaboration Cited in Success

climbers at the top of a pass with backpacks meeting the sunrise in the mountains

In the episode featuring Sheets & GigglesCEO Colin McIntosh, says that The Colorado community is literally the reason that this company exists and we try to give back as much as we can as a thank you.”  As an example, Colin shares the story of when starting the company he reached out to Chris White, the CEO of Shinesty – a Colorado company selling collection of outlandish clothing (and featuring Ball Hammocks for Father’s Day!), for advice about warehousing and shipping.  Chris offered to have Colin begin shipping out of the Shinesty warehouse to get things going.  In my last blog post I mentioned that Colorado’s entrepreneurial brand includes collaboration, and on cue, Colin McIntosh supported that in his episode of ProCO360.   

Can Colorado’s Brand have a CAUSE?

This is a big question.  

It came to me after my interview with Johnny Le Coq, founder and CEO of Fishpond.  Patagonia is a products company that supports the environment.  Athleta is a products company that supports the advancement of women.  Both companies are examples of authentic and effective support for a cause that aligns with customers.  Fishpond seems to go further – Fishpond seems to be coming very close to using sales of its products as a mechanism to support river conservation.   

 Image courtesy of the Fishpond website 

Johnny: “Our brand has become a voice for the environment… It’s not what we sell that I’m most proud of – it’s what we stand for.”  He means it. 

 That made me think about Colorado.  Can Colorado have a CAUSE that ultimately becomes interwoven with our brand?  That’s tough, but I think Colorado’s entrepreneurial community DOES – it STANDS FOR supporting opportunity for those who strive, collaborate, innovate, and mutually appreciate the rich lives that people wish to have in our great state.  

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